Trinidad Drilling International Rig Accommodations

Rig speak 101: Livin’ that camp life

Rig hands can spend up to half the year away from home, often working in remote locations, and sometimes in other countries. Exposed to the elements for up to twelve and a half hours a shift, they need to be well-rested and well-fed to perform their duties safely and efficiently on the rig.

For newcomers to the drilling business, here’s a look at where rig hands hang their hats at the end of the day. Welcome to camp life! Continue reading

Trinidad Drilling well-trained rig crews

Rig speak 101: Rig crew basics

Working on a drilling rig is no desk job – it can be loud and dirty with plenty of exposure to the elements. It’s also a rewarding career with high earning potential, and a work schedule that’s far from your everyday nine to five with only three weeks’ vacation a year.

If you’re considering a career on the rigs and want to know about each position, this blog is for you. Read on as we take you through crew basics, describe rig positions, and explain why Trinidad is the employer of choice among new and experienced hands. Continue reading

Trinidad Drilling

Rig speak 101: It’s all about the mud

On a rig, mud does a lot more than land on your coveralls. The mud that circulates through a well bore is instrumental to oil and gas drilling.

In last week’s blog post, we gave you a look at a day in the life of a Derrickhand. The Derrickhand’s responsibilities include maintaining the rig’s mud systems and mud properties. This week, we want to give newcomers to the drilling business a guide to the sophisticated world of mud!

What role does mud play in the drilling process?

When a hole is being drilled, drilling fluids or “mud” is circulated through the well bore. This mud performs many functions including:

  • Bringing “cuttings” to the surface (cuttings are fragments of rock dislodged by the bit)
  • Cooling and lubricating the drill bit
  • Controlling pressure
  • Stabilizing the hole

Continue reading

Rig speak 101: Welcome to the jungle

Trinidad Rig 130Rig hands have their own language. In fact, we provide our green hands with a translation dictionary before they hit the field (OK, it’s not really a dictionary. It’s just a glossary). Just like any language, dialects can change slightly from rig to rig, but many of the terms are universal, so newbies will want to familiarize themselves with the basics.

If you’re a seasoned hand, skip to the second part of this post where we have provided a roundup of some of our favourite animal-inspired rig terms. Welcome to the jungle!

For newbies: Terms to learn now

The first “Rig speak 101” basic to know is that there is a difference between service rigs and drilling rigs. We operate drilling rigs. Continue reading

Rig word of the day: substructure — #RigSpeak101

Drilling rig substructure

We mention substructures (a.k.a. “subs”) a lot on the blog, often in relation to moving or walking systems. Located directly over the well, the substructure raises, lowers and supports the rig floor, derrick and other rig floor components like the drawworks.

A common substructure is the slingshot sub. They begin in a folded position and are then unfolded as hydraulic cylinders or winches raise the rig into place. On a slingshot sub, all rig floor components are installed and rigged up with the floor lowered.

You can find slingshot substructures in action on our blog on Rig 38 and our 3,600 HP 700 series.

Rig word of the day: drill bit — #RigSpeak101

Drill Bit

The bit is on the bottom of the drill string and must be changed when it becomes excessively dull or stops making progress. Most bits work by scraping or crushing the rock, or both, usually as part of a rotational motion. Some bits, known as hammer bits, pound the rock vertically in much the same fashion as a construction site air hammer.*

Paired with the right technology, equipment and rig crews, drilling rigs have the capability to drill miles below the earth’s surface into tough formations. Learn more about rig upgrades we have underway to allow our rigs to drill deeper than ever before.

*Denotes definition from Schlumberger Oilfield Glossary

Rig word of the day: triple – #RigSpeak101

Triple drilling rig

Sure, you hear the lingo all the time, but have you ever wondered how single, double and triple drilling rigs are named? We have you covered. The derrick on a triple can hold three joints of drill pipe; a double can hold two; and a single can hold one. The taller the derrick, the longer the pipe string it can hold.

Almost 50% of the rigs in Trinidad’s fleet are triples. Check out a few of them here: