Rig word of the day: substructure — #RigSpeak101

Drilling rig substructure

We mention substructures (a.k.a. “subs”) a lot on the blog, often in relation to moving or walking systems. Located directly over the well, the substructure raises, lowers and supports the rig floor, derrick and other rig floor components like the drawworks.

A common substructure is the slingshot sub. They begin in a folded position and are then unfolded as hydraulic cylinders or winches raise the rig into place. On a slingshot sub, all rig floor components are installed and rigged up with the floor lowered.

You can find slingshot substructures in action on our blog on Rig 38 and our 3,600 HP 700 series.

Rig word of the day: drill bit — #RigSpeak101

Drill Bit

The bit is on the bottom of the drill string and must be changed when it becomes excessively dull or stops making progress. Most bits work by scraping or crushing the rock, or both, usually as part of a rotational motion. Some bits, known as hammer bits, pound the rock vertically in much the same fashion as a construction site air hammer.*

Paired with the right technology, equipment and rig crews, drilling rigs have the capability to drill miles below the earth’s surface into tough formations. Learn more about rig upgrades we have underway to allow our rigs to drill deeper than ever before.

*Denotes definition from Schlumberger Oilfield Glossary

Rig word of the day: triple – #RigSpeak101

Triple drilling rig

Sure, you hear the lingo all the time, but have you ever wondered how single, double and triple drilling rigs are named? We have you covered. The derrick on a triple can hold three joints of drill pipe; a double can hold two; and a single can hold one. The taller the derrick, the longer the pipe string it can hold.

Almost 50% of the rigs in Trinidad’s fleet are triples. Check out a few of them here: