Roughneck raised with Les and Gaston Hodge

Roughneck raised with Les Hodge

With his dad working on and off the rigs since he was eight years old, Les Hodge understands what it means to be roughneck raised.

Working a 20 and 10 schedule, Hodge’s dad would fly to Alberta for 20 days of work then make the 6,000 km trip back to spend ten days at home in Savage Cove, Newfoundland. No matter how tempted he may have been to relax on his days off, his dad was always determined to make the most of his time with family. Continue reading

Meet Christopher Suitt: motorhand and military man

Christopher Suitt, childhood buddy John, Christopher’s grandpa

Being a soldier is in Christopher Suitt’s blood. Born into a long line of veterans, Suitt’s family has been in the U.S. military for close to 90 consecutive years. His grandfather served, his uncles served, and his cousins continue to serve.

We caught up with the Motorhand on Rig 446 and sergeant in the United States Army, as he finishes up his last hitch before his first overseas tour.

In this Q&A, Suitt talks about why the rigs turned out to be a perfect fit for his military background. Continue reading

Part two: what do MacGyver, drilling rigs and a little luck have in common?

Two weeks ago, we learned about Adrian Lachance’s oil patch genealogy and the time he tried his luck at acting. This week, we’ll explain Lachance’s status as a MacGyver of sorts in the drilling business and describe how Trinidad’s Chief Operating Officer got to where he is today.

For those of you who have worked on a Bear Drilling rig or are part of Trinidad’s Candrill 1,500 fan club, this blog’s for you. Continue reading

Bear Drilling Rig 5

Part one: what do MacGyver, drilling rigs and a little luck have in common?

This is the first of two blog posts with Trinidad’s Chief Operating Officer (COO), Adrian Lachance.

You name it, this guy’s done it. From auditioning for the hit TV series MacGyver in the 1980s, to starting two successful businesses, Red Deer, Alberta native and Trinidad’s COO has a story that’s sure to surprise you.

Known today for his passionate demeanor, extensive industry knowledge, and experience with technical drilling, Lachance has been instrumental to Trinidad’s success over the years. A visionary at heart, not even he could have predicted the road that got him to where he is today. Continue reading

How to stay busy during spring break-up in Canada

3 ways to stay busy during spring break-up in Canada

Drilling activity in western Canada is busiest during the winter months. From October to mid-March, cold temperatures freeze the ground enough for drilling companies to move rigs without damaging municipal roads.

Come April, as temperatures rise, the ground thaws, and road bans are put in place, a number of rigs are shut down and stacked for what the industry calls “spring break-up.” Typically lasting anywhere from six weeks to three months (depending on weather, activity levels, and the rig’s location), crews are laid off to wait out the thaw.

“Lots of hands look for temporary work during break-up, often picking up seasonal jobs like landscaping or farming,” explained Trisha Hennig, Field Services Manager in our Canadian division. “Others budget throughout the year and take the time off to travel.” Continue reading

Trinidad Drilling jobs

Advice from the pros: resume tips from Trinidad’s Canadian recruiters

This week on the blog, we’re talking about resume dos and don’ts with Trinidad’s Canadian recruitment team. With 37 years of combined experience between Field Services Manager, Trisha Hennig, and her team of Coordinators, Carmen Thorne, Megan Myshak, and Sarah Hallgren, this crew knows how to staff drilling rigs and they know how to do it efficiently.

Filtering through thousands of resumes a year and staffing up to dozens of rigs between the team at one time is no small feat. How can you make your resume stand out from the thousands of others? Seeking advice from the pros is always a good place to start. Continue reading

Trinidad Drilling well-trained rig crews

Rig speak 101: rig crew basics

Working on a drilling rig is no desk job – it can be loud and dirty with plenty of exposure to the elements. It’s also a rewarding career with high earning potential, and a work schedule that’s far from your everyday nine to five with only three weeks’ vacation a year.

If you’re considering a career on the rigs and want to know about each position, this blog is for you. Read on as we take you through crew basics, describe rig positions, and explain why Trinidad is the employer of choice among new and experienced hands. Continue reading

Trinidad Drilling International Rig Crew Saudi Arabia

What’s coming down the talent pipeline in Saudi Arabia

Whether it be at home or overseas, we work hard to invest in the communities we drill in to ensure they’re better off as a result of us being there. One of the ways we’re doing this is by hiring, developing, and mentoring local talent on our drilling rigs through Trinidad Essential Skills Training (T.E.S.T.).

T.E.S.T. is our competency-assurance program that defines global performance standards for each position on our rigs (Floorhand, Motorhand, Derrickhand and Driller). Every rig hand that steps foot into Trinidad coveralls is assessed on these standards to ensure they can perform the skills required for their position. Continue reading

Trinidad Drilling Drilling Rig 106

5 tips for a roughneck starting their career with Trinidad

When Mike Heier founded Trinidad Drilling in 1996, he knew that as the company grew, he wanted to build awesome rigs while fostering a culture that put people first. By offering on-the-job training and promoting from within, Heier’s visions ring true today – just ask our CEO, Lyle Whitmarsh; our Top Drive Superintendent, Brent Kryzanowski; and our Canadian HSE Compliance Manager, Erika Rocha.

Rig Manager Wayne Adam’s career progression at Trinidad has been no different. Adam’s journey to his current gig on Rig 127 in Saudi Arabia began on Rig 106, when we expanded south of the 49th parallel in 2005. After ten plus years with us, Adam’s opinion of the company hasn’t changed one bit. Continue reading