Inside Trinidad’s 2017 rig upgrade program: Part one

This is the first post in our two-part series on Trinidad’s 2017 rig upgrade program.

Anyone that’s been in our industry for a period of time understands we don’t stand still for long. Oilfield technology is ever-evolving in response to changing prices, oil and gas plays, and demand. That’s why our team selected just over 30 rigs in Trinidad’s fleet to undergo upgrades in 2017.

When we finish up this year’s upgrade program, half of Trinidad’s US rigs will classify as ultra high-spec, modified to meet customer demand in west Texas.

“Our drilling environment is changing with deeper, more challenging lateral wells, and low commodity prices,” explained David Gibson, Trinidad’s Senior VP of US Operations. “So we’re upgrading US rigs, backed by contracts, to tackle longer and deeper wells, and drill more efficiently.”

Gibson walked us through some of the upgrades underway to take on west Texas’ long lateral wells. Here’s what you need to know: Continue reading

Spotlight on technology: The way a top drive works

This is the first post in Trinidad’s three-part series on top drives. 

Trinidad top driveThere is no question that top drives have changed the drilling industry. They have made rigs safer and more efficient. Plus, the technology allows us to reach drilling targets that were once considered unreachable.

“The top drive drilling system is one of the most significant advancements in drilling technology,” said Brent Kryzanowski, General Manager, Canadian Operations and the Top Drive expert for Trinidad’s Canadian fleet.

In this post, Kryzanowski explains how the game-changing innovation works. Continue reading

The top 3 ways Trinidad is minimizing its environmental footprint

Our crews are outside every day. We work alongside stunning natural surroundings, and that is why we are keenly aware that Trinidad, like all companies, has a responsibility to minimize our impact on the environment.

Here are three ways we are doing that:

DSCN01951. Preventing drilling fluid leaks

Rigs use drilling fluid (or “mud”) to control pressure and stabilize the hole while drilling. We are working to make sure fluids don’t leak near the drilling site by engineering containment solutions where spills are likely to occur from the top drive to the mud tank. If a leak does occur, Trinidad has policies in place to safely deal with the incident.

“Newer rigs have built in vacuum services to quickly recover spilled fluids,” explained Darryl Hostyn, HSE Manager for Trinidad’s Canadian drilling division.

We also ensure our equipment is well maintained, which helps to prevent leaks. Continue reading

Trinidad Drilling

Rig speak 101: It’s all about the mud

On a rig, mud does a lot more than land on your coveralls. The mud that circulates through a well bore is instrumental to oil and gas drilling.

In last week’s blog post, we gave you a look at a day in the life of a Derrickhand. The Derrickhand’s responsibilities include maintaining the rig’s mud systems and mud properties. This week, we want to give newcomers to the drilling business a guide to the sophisticated world of mud!

What role does mud play in the drilling process?

When a hole is being drilled, drilling fluids or “mud” is circulated through the well bore. This mud performs many functions including:

  • Bringing “cuttings” to the surface (cuttings are fragments of rock dislodged by the bit)
  • Cooling and lubricating the drill bit
  • Controlling pressure
  • Stabilizing the hole

Continue reading

A day in the life of a Derrickhand with Trinidad Drilling

Trinidad DrillingOf all the crew members on a rig, the Derrickhand position is probably the most well known because the Derrickhand climbs the rig’s derrick to work on a platform usually 25 metres above the rig floor.

“I’m the guy who has to put the belt on. Anytime there is something (to be done) up high, I put the belt on and go up the derrick,” said Larince Yewchuk, a Derrickhand on Trinidad Rig 2, referring to the safety harness Trinidad’s hands must wear while working at a height over three metres.

Yewchuk, whose rig operates mostly in southern Alberta, talked to us about what it is like to be a Derrickhand. Continue reading