Rig word of the day: drill bit — #RigSpeak101

Drill Bit

The bit is on the bottom of the drill string and must be changed when it becomes excessively dull or stops making progress. Most bits work by scraping or crushing the rock, or both, usually as part of a rotational motion. Some bits, known as hammer bits, pound the rock vertically in much the same fashion as a construction site air hammer.*

Paired with the right technology, equipment and rig crews, drilling rigs have the capability to drill miles below the earth’s surface into tough formations. Learn more about rig upgrades we have underway to allow our rigs to drill deeper than ever before.

*Denotes definition from Schlumberger Oilfield Glossary

Rig word of the day: triple – #RigSpeak101

Triple drilling rig

Sure, you hear the lingo all the time, but have you ever wondered how single, double and triple drilling rigs are named? We have you covered. The derrick on a triple can hold three joints of drill pipe; a double can hold two; and a single can hold one. The taller the derrick, the longer the pipe string it can hold.

Almost 50% of the rigs in Trinidad’s fleet are triples. Check out a few of them here:

Spotlight on technology: Teaming-up with RigMinder

Another strategic acquisition at Trinidad

As you may have gathered from our news release issued on August 28th, there’s some exciting stuff going down at Trinidad. With the recent acquisition of RigMinder comes significant technology additions that are complementary to our fleet of 149 drilling rigs.

“Joining forces with RigMinder’s team is an exciting step forward in terms of technology on our rigs,” explained Adrian Lachance, Trinidad’s Chief Operating Officer (and rig technology enthusiast).

We’re all excited about the unique potential the acquisition brings to Trinidad’s rig fleet.” Continue reading

Pre-employment physical evaluations on a drilling rig

Physical evaluations: Are you fit-for-duty?

This is the second post in our two-part series on pre-employment testing in Trinidad’s US division.

It’s no secret that working on a drilling rig involves labour-intensive work – often performed in extreme conditions. That’s why new rig hands have to be deemed “fit-for-duty” before they head out to the field to ensure they can handle the physical and mental requirements of their assigned job. To be rig-ready, they need to pass both a drug and alcohol test, and a physical evaluation.

With a solid grip on Trinidad’s zero-tolerance stance on substance abuse and testing procedures, it’s time to get physical! Read on as HR Supervisor, Amanda Vaught, takes us through physical evaluations in our US division. Continue reading

Drug and alcohol testing oilfield

Drilling rigs are no place for drugs and alcohol

This is the first post in our two-part series on pre-employment testing in our US division.

It’s as simple as this: there’s no place for substance abuse on a drilling rig. That’s why every rig hand that receives an employment offer with Trinidad has to pass a mandatory drug and alcohol test prior to hitting the field.

“Trinidad has a zero-tolerance policy for substance abuse,” explained Amanda Vaught, HR Supervisor based out of our Houston, Texas office. “We work endlessly to ensure our crews go home in the same shape they came to work in and confirming they’re fit-for-duty is a crucial step in making sure that happens.”

Read on as Vaught explains part one of the pre-employment testing process in our US division. Here’s how drug and alcohol testing works. Continue reading

Rig Profile: Trinidad Drilling Rig 100

This week on the blog, we’re introducing our new spin on an old favourite!

Rig 100 holds a special place in the hearts of those that have been with Trinidad since the beginning. Well-known as a 1,500 HP SCR Triple and the first rig in our US fleet, recent upgrades have taken the ten-year-old rig to a whole new level. Currently drilling in the Permian Basin, the new and improved 2,000 HP AC XL (extended lateral) Triple is aiming for depths it wasn’t capable of…until now.

Read on as Ronald Williams, lead engineer on Rig 100’s recent upgrade, explains why this old favourite has people talking.

Trinidad Drilling Rig 100 Continue reading

Trinidad Drilling Rig 40

Photo blog: rigs ‘n rainbows

Working on a drilling rig in the middle of nowhere has its perks. With no traffic, no overpasses and no skyscrapers (other than that of a towering pine tree), roughnecks often get to witness moments like this.

Ok, ok, so double rainbows might not be as magical for you as they are to the Double Rainbow Guy, but when you get to experience something like this, you can’t help but pause for a moment of gratitude.

Here’s a look at what our crews often get to see from their “office” (click to see full size image). Continue reading

Got bubbles? No troubles: 3 reasons you’ll want to work on a clean rig

When it comes to managing a clean rig, Rig Manager Tracy Stewart runs a pretty tight ship. If you were to do a dust check on Rig 127 in Saudi Arabia, we’re willing to bet the results would impress you. Admittedly, if you were to do a dust check at Stewart’s home, the results may vary (but that’s beside the point).

Ask anyone that’s worked at Trinidad, and they’ll tell you performance is the name of our game. It’s part of everything we do, from designing our rigs, to training our crews and maintaining our equipment. In our pursuit of performance, you’d be surprised at the role a soapy scrub brush, a pressure washer, and a little elbow grease can play. Continue reading

5 bumper stickers for the roughneck in all of us

Let’s talk bumper stickers!

From showcasing our political preferences, warning those behind us of our driving tendencies, or rallying for groups we support, we’ve all seen a bumper sticker we can relate to. A good bumper sticker has the uncanny ability to form tribes of like-minded strangers on the infamous Route 66 or Trans-Canada Highway.

For all those that are proud to be part of our tribe, these are for you and the bumper of your beloved Truck Norris: Continue reading

Trinidad Drilling Rig Postcard Trinidad Rig 40

Rig postcards from… Rig 40 in British Columbia, Canada

This week on the blog, we’re enjoying British Columbia’s (B.C.) sunsets with the crews on Rig 40, a 166,800 daN tele double in our Canadian fleet!

At its current location near Fort St. John, B.C., the average temperature in January is a brisk -15 degrees Celsius / 5 degrees Fahrenheit. Chilled at the thought of it? Find out how our crews stay safe when the temperature drops by eating right, dressing for the weather, and educating themselves on signs of frostbite and hypothermia. Continue reading