AC rig

What is an AC rig?

If you’ve followed along on our blog and social media channels, you’re probably familiar with AC rigs by now – after all, we’re pretty proud of our fleet. But what exactly are they?

Wayne Kuzio, Canadian Senior Field Superintendent here at Trinidad, and the Canadian rig managers worked together to provide us with the details.

Craig Barker, a Relief Rig Manager from rig 56, put it very clearly: “Control…it is all about control.” So what does that mean to the rest of us?

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Trinidad Drilling Rig 54

3 ways we’ve enhanced our rig design to reduce emissions

We always share pictures of our rigs in the most beautiful landscapes. Our favourite shots are often the ones submitted by our crews. Not only do roughnecks love the iron they work on, but they love where they do it – away from city lights with front row seats to the best sunrises and sunsets around.

We share the same appreciation for the great outdoors as our crews do. That’s why we have an engineering and design team making sure we’re minimizing the environmental impact of our operations.

Read on as team leader and mechanical engineer, Jake Hamdan, shares the latest on how we have enhanced our rig fleet to reduce emissions. Continue reading

Rig Profile: Trinidad Drilling Rig 129

This week on the blog, we’re showcasing Rig 129 in our US fleet. Currently drilling in the Barnett Shale, this rig has proven to be the king of shallow horizontal wells in an urban setting.

Trinidad Drilling Rig 129

City drillin’

Unlike Trinidad’s rigs operating in the forests of northern British Columbia, or the sandy plains of Saudi Arabia, Rig 129 finds itself right at home around bustling urban centers. Thanks to its size, weight, and unique skidding system, the rig can maneuver around smaller pads in heavily populated areas with ease.

Trinidad Drilling Rig 130
Trinidad Rig 130 (Rig 129’s “sister rig”) drilling in Arlington, Texas in 2012

Minimizing the rig’s environmental impact

Here’s how Rig 129 is doing its part in minimizing its environmental footprint:

  • Rig 129’s generators are available on demand so they’re only running at peak when required.
  • The rig can be operated off of highline power, when available, to reduce emissions and generator noise.
  • Sound walls are constructed around the rig to minimize noise pollution.
  • With a smaller location size, the rig’s footprint is less intrusive.
  • When the rig is drilling in an urban area, trees are planted around the lease.

Self-diagnostic control system

Rig 129 also boasts an automatic driller and touchscreen controls to monitor drilling parameters remotely, like weight on bit and rate of penetration.

Looking for more Trinidad rig profiles? Check out Rig 100, another rig in our US fleet, recently upgraded to drill in the Permian Basin in west Texas.

Spotlight on technology: how automated pipe-handling systems are making the Derrickhand’s job safer

Trinidad Drilling Rig 58

A Derrickhand stands on a rig 90 feet up into the sky. From there, he aligns pipes and directs them from the racking board fingers to the top drive, and vice versa.

The work is intensely physical, and there are always safety concerns, as well.

That’s why Trinidad Drilling is moving to an automated pipe-handling system on the derrick. It’s an exciting new development, both for safety and efficiency, and Trinidad has been testing it for about a year.

With the new system, the Derrickhand is comfortably inside the doghouse, instead of up on the monkeyboard. Instead of manually handling the pipes, he’s controlling them with a machine that carries out multiple functions automatically.

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The top 3 ways Trinidad is minimizing its environmental footprint

Our crews are outside every day. We work alongside stunning natural surroundings, and that is why we are keenly aware that Trinidad, like all companies, has a responsibility to minimize our impact on the environment.

Here are three ways we are doing that:

DSCN01951. Preventing drilling fluid leaks

Rigs use drilling fluid (or “mud”) to control pressure and stabilize the hole while drilling. We are working to make sure fluids don’t leak near the drilling site by engineering containment solutions where spills are likely to occur from the top drive to the mud tank. If a leak does occur, Trinidad has policies in place to safely deal with the incident.

“Newer rigs have built in vacuum services to quickly recover spilled fluids,” explained Darryl Hostyn, HSE Manager for Trinidad’s Canadian drilling division.

We also ensure our equipment is well maintained, which helps to prevent leaks. Continue reading