Advice from an oilfield dad

Glenn Heffernan, Rig 51 motorhand and father of three

Taking a leap of faith for family

After 21 years working as a car mechanic in his hometown of Saint Phillips, Newfoundland, Glenn Heffernan called it quits. A dedicated husband and father of three, Glenn knew it was time for a career that would provide the life he always wanted for his family.

“Like any dad, I wanted to give them what they deserved,” said Glenn.

He knew from friends in the oil and gas industry that working on the rigs could provide the financial freedom he was looking for.

“When I was about to leave for my first hitch in Alberta, I told my wife I’d do it for five years, maximum,” Glenn chuckled, in one of those loveable accents Canadian east-coasters are known for.

“That was ten years ago.”

Glenn has been a motorhand at Trinidad since he started his career in the oil patch. Like many from Canada’s east coast, he flies over 6,500 kilometers (4,040 miles) to and from Alberta to work a two-and-one schedule (two weeks at work and one week at home).

After a decade in the industry, he knows all about life as an oilfield dad. Continue reading

Meet Christopher Suitt: motorhand and military man

Christopher Suitt, childhood buddy John, Christopher’s grandpa

Being a soldier is in Christopher Suitt’s blood. Born into a long line of veterans, Suitt’s family has been in the U.S. military for close to 90 consecutive years. His grandfather served, his uncles served, and his cousins continue to serve.

We caught up with the Motorhand on Rig 446 and sergeant in the United States Army, as he finishes up his last hitch before his first overseas tour.

In this Q&A, Suitt talks about why the rigs turned out to be a perfect fit for his military background. Continue reading

Trinidad Drilling well-trained rig crews

Rig speak 101: Rig crew basics

Working on a drilling rig is no desk job – it can be loud and dirty with plenty of exposure to the elements. It’s also a rewarding career with high earning potential, and a work schedule that’s far from your everyday nine to five with only three weeks’ vacation a year.

If you’re considering a career on the rigs and want to know about each position, this blog is for you. Read on as we take you through crew basics, describe rig positions, and explain why Trinidad is the employer of choice among new and experienced hands. Continue reading

Drilling down: What’s it really like to be a Motorhand?

Drilling is in Mitchell Andersen’s blood. His grandfather drilled. His uncles drilled.

“It’s the family business,” said Andersen.

“I’m from Alberta, and in Alberta, we drill for oil.”

Andersen is a Motorhand on Trinidad Rig 92, a heavy double that operates near Rocky Mountain House, between Edmonton and Calgary.

Map
The location of Trinidad Rig 92. Click map for more details. (Map data from Google)

The seven year oilfield veteran shared his thoughts on working as a Motorhand and choosing a career in the patchContinue reading

Trinidad Drilling crew

4 reasons you should work with a well-trained crew

Our crews are some of the most skilled and knowledgeable in the drilling business, and we’re committed to growing their careers and keeping them safe. As part of that commitment, Trinidad created a company-wide training program called Trinidad Essential Skills Training (T.E.S.T.) to help ensure members of our team have a safe and successful career.

Why this T.E.S.T. is one you’ll want to take

T.E.S.T. is a competency-assurance program. The program clearly defines performance standards for each position on a rig. Rig hands are assessed on these standards to ensure they can competently perform the skills required for their position. The assessment (see example below) is designed to ensure field hands have the knowledge, skills, abilities and attitudes required to do their job correctly and safely.Trinidad Essential Skills Training Continue reading