Trinidad Rig 123 Pithand Bennie McFerran

5 questions with Pithand, Bennie McFerran, on the safest rig in Trinidad’s fleet

Bennie McFerran is one of the newest guys on Trinidad Rig 123, currently drilling in Reeves County, Texas. Admittedly a bit nervous to start with a new company in November of last year, McFerran’s nerves were quickly put aside when he found out the crew he was joining was coming up on eight years without a recordable incident.

“I’d heard Trinidad was a good company to work for and knew they had nice rigs, but I didn’t know how great the company was until I started. Safety records like this are something special,” said McFerran.

We caught up with the rig’s newest Pithand to find out what it’s like working on the safest rig in Trinidad’s fleet. Here’s what McFerran had to say. Continue reading

Trinidad Drilling reaches its lowest company-wide TRIR in history

Trinidad reaches its lowest company-wide TRIR in history

A few weeks ago, we spoke with John Meckert about his thirty-year career in the industry and how a few key moments changed his perspective on safety forever. This week, Meckert explains how he and his team helped Trinidad hit its lowest company-wide total recordable incident rate (TRIR)* in 21 years.

“In 2016, Trinidad achieved a TRIR of 0.75,” said Meckert, Trinidad’s Vice President of HSE and QMS. “Meaning we had fewer recordable incidents than ever on our rigs.”

Driving Trinidad’s safety record to all-time lows

Down from a rate of over one in 2015, Meckert believes our 2016 TRIR is a reflection of how well Trinidad’s proactive safety efforts are working. It is also a reflection of the company’s safety culture. Continue reading

Trinidad Drilling Rig 136

Trinidad Rig 136: A crew that cooks together, stays safe together

Field Superintendent Thomas McKenzie and the crews on Rig 136 would be the first tell you that working six straight years with no recordable incidents is no small feat. They’re also proof that it’s possible.

Programs like Trinidad’s Reliability Triangle and T.E.S.T. play instrumental roles in building the foundations for a safe rig, but rigs like 136 with significant safety milestones seem to have a little something extra working in their favour; friendships that go beyond the rig floor. Continue reading

Guest post: 6 safe years on Trinidad Drilling’s Rig 124

Trinidad Drilling's Rig 124 in the U.S.Brandon Merriman and Trinidad Drilling have a “from the beginning” kind of relationship. The Rig Manager has worked with Trinidad since he started his drilling career more than eight years ago, and he has worked on Rig 124 from the time it hit the field in 2009.

“I bleed Trinidad green,” said Merriman, who lives in northern Louisiana and has seen Trinidad’s U.S. division grow from its early days (we started operating south of the 49th parallel in 2005).

Merriman was at Rig 124’s helm when it celebrated six years without a recordable incident in June. This week, we decided to hand the blog over to Merriman to talk about his rig’s safety journey: Continue reading

How Rig 9 went 1,400 days without an incident

If you want to know the secret to operating a safe rig, ask Orland Cook. He is the tool push on Trinidad’s Rig 9, which has worked over 1,400 days* without a recordable injury.

“As long as I have run a crew on the rigs, whether it was drilling or as a Rig Manager, I have always believed that if you are organized and work at a comfortable pace, that you can be safe and efficient every day,” said Cook, a 19-year veteran of the drilling industry.

Here are some of Cook’s secrets to safety success. Continue reading

Rig 108: 6 years on the job with no recordable incidents

Meet the crew of Trinidad Rig 108. Rig 108 operates in Reeves County, Texas, and drills in the West Texas Permian basin. It has been commissioned for six years, and in that time its crews have never had a recordable incident.

Mike Sasser is the HSE Manager for Trinidad’s US Southern Division ­– which includes Rig 108. His job is to build a proactive safety culture on Trinidad’s rigs.

“People have to understand safety is personal. It is about them at the end of the day. We want everyone to return home the way they came to work,” explained Sasser. Continue reading