Trinidad Drilling International Rig Crew Saudi Arabia

What’s coming down the talent pipeline in Saudi Arabia

Whether it be at home or overseas, we work hard to invest in the communities we drill in to ensure they’re better off as a result of us being there. One of the ways we’re doing this is by hiring, developing, and mentoring local talent on our drilling rigs through Trinidad Essential Skills Training (T.E.S.T.).

T.E.S.T. is our competency-assurance program that defines global performance standards for each position on our rigs (Floorhand, Motorhand, Derrickhand and Driller). Every rig hand that steps foot into Trinidad coveralls is assessed on these standards to ensure they can perform the skills required for their position. Continue reading

2,222 days of safety: Rig 41

 

Trinidad Drilling Rig 41

When it comes to safety, Trinidad Rig 41 is king.

Every Trinidad rig works toward zero incidents every single day, and Rig 41 shows how it’s done.

Rig Manager George Deveson gets a ton of credit for guiding his rig to 2,222 days of safety.

He has been in the oil industry for just over 32 years, a Rig Manager for 14, and on Rig 41 near Grande Prairie, Alberta, for eight years. It’s fair to say he has the experience, not to mention the dedication, to keep his crew safe.

Continue reading

Guest post: 6 safe years on Trinidad Drilling’s Rig 124

Trinidad Drilling's Rig 124 in the U.S.Brandon Merriman and Trinidad Drilling have a “from the beginning” kind of relationship. The Rig Manager has worked with Trinidad since he started his drilling career more than eight years ago, and he has worked on Rig 124 from the time it hit the field in 2009.

“I bleed Trinidad green,” said Merriman, who lives in northern Louisiana and has seen Trinidad’s U.S. division grow from its early days (we started operating south of the 49th parallel in 2005).

Merriman was at Rig 124’s helm when it celebrated six years without a recordable incident in June. This week, we decided to hand the blog over to Merriman to talk about his rig’s safety journey: Continue reading

Safety values have no borders

This post is part of Trinidad’s “Focus on safety” blog series. 

Trinidad Drilling's Rig 701 in Mexico.

It doesn’t matter if your rig is in the Saudi Arabian desert or the boreal forest of northern Alberta, we all go to work for the same reason. 

“That’s the common thread that international companies have: You have different languages, different cultures, different customs, but the one common thing is that we all work and want to make our lives better and that of our families,” said Derek Hibbard, General Manager of HSE for Trinidad’s U.S. and international divisions.

That common thread, explained Hibbard, is the reason safety is important no matter what country you are operating in.

We drill in Canada, Mexico, Saudi Arabia and the U.S., and our commitment to safety is the same in each place because everyone deserves to go home safe to their family at the end of the day.

Here’s what we’re doing to ensure our safety values always travel alongside our rigs to their international destinations. Continue reading

4 big safety questions answered

This is the first post in Trinidad’s “Focus on safety” blog series.

Trinidad Drilling’s Bradley Huber discusses health and safety best practices at the Oil and Gas Awards Industry Summit.
Trinidad Drilling’s Bradley Huber, far left, discusses health and safety best practices at the Oil and Gas Awards Industry Summit.

When the market slumps, does safety get pinched? Do companies only strive to meet the minimum standards?

These were some of the critical questions discussed last week at the Oil and Gas Awards Industry Summit in Calgary. Trinidad Drilling’s Bradley Huber, General Manager of HSE for our Canadian drilling division, was a member of the health and safety panel that addressed some of these pressing topics.

Here are some of the insights Huber shared during the discussion. Continue reading

The crew of Trinidad Rig 133 celebrates five years without an incident.

10 steps for a safer rig: A Toolpush’s top tips

When Trinidad Rig 133 reached five years without a recordable incident, one of our HSE leaders asked its Rig Manager how the milestone was achieved. The reply from Blake Walsworth was so impressive, the Trinidad safety team shared it throughout our organization.

Walsworth, whose rig operates primarily in northwest Louisiana and East Texas, had created an in-depth list of the ways his team takes care of each other.

Safety is the most important issue to us out here,” said Walsworth. “We’re essentially family; we spend more time on the rigs than we do with our families at home. I believe that is what makes safety so important to us. You wouldn’t want anything to happen to one of your family members.”

Walsworth’s list of safety leadership tools could be useful to anyone in the industry, so we thought we would share it here. Continue reading

5 things that make Trinidad Drilling rigs stand out

Trinidad Rig 58Trinidad’s rigs stand out. Literally. Trinidad Rig 58, pictured here, is nearly 60-metres high and is one of the largest rigs in North America. But our strength as a drilling contractor is not just about size. It’s about the performance of our rigs in the field.

Jeff Mitton, a Contracts Manager with Trinidad’s Canadian division, helped explain five reasons why Trinidad’s rigs stand out for the crews who work on them and for the customers who work with them. Continue reading

4 ways international drilling gigs are life changing

Michael Portman has wanted to drill internationally since he started working on the rigs 10 years ago, so when Trinidad put out a bulletin asking for employees to go on assignment to Saudi Arabia, he applied that day.

“I’ve always wanted to go work overseas, so when the opportunity came up, I couldn’t say no,” said Portman, a Derrickhand from Vancouver, B.C.

Portman just finished his first hitch on Rig 126, an upgraded triple operating in the Khurais oil field, about three and a half hours southwest of Dammam, the capital of Eastern Province, Saudi Arabia.

It’s early days, but here are four things Portman is getting to experience on this new adventure:  Continue reading

How to ace your first day on the rigs

Rig Manager Steve Stewart (far left) with fellow crew members from Rig 42.
Rig Manager Steve Stewart (far left) with fellow crew members from Rig 42.

The first day on any new job can be overwhelming. Day one for new rig hands can be extra intimidating because their new office is a towering rig full of technically-advanced equipment and numerous moving parts. That’s why we work hard to make sure newbies feel comfortable and safe when they start their new gig.

Steve Stewart, Rig Manager of Trinidad Rig 42, is in charge of training new crew members who start on his B.C.-based rig.

“The biggest thing I stress about working on drilling rigs is to be aware of your surroundings, ask lots of questions and work safe,” said Stewart, who has been with Trinidad for 11 years.

To help prepare you for your first day, Stewart shared some advice on what green hands can expect and some pointers on how you can put your best foot forward. Continue reading

Trinidad Drilling

4 ways to make rigs safer

Here’s what safety means to us: Every person who works on a Trinidad Drilling rig needs to go home safe every day. Period.

Trinidad is working to continuously improve safety by using advanced technologies to automate potentially dangerous rig activities. However, technology alone can’t keep crews safe. At Trinidad, we’re working to create a safety culture that combines both safe behaviour and safe technology.

Brian Davis, HSE Manager for Trinidad’s U.S. operations, spoke to us about some of the ways Trinidad is taking a proactive approach to safety.

1. STOP unsafe activities

Rig safety is both everyone’s right and everyone’s responsibility, Davis explained. That is why Trinidad’s rigs use the “Look-Out” program, which teaches crew members to look for, stop and report unsafe activities.

“Look-Out is the tool we use to empower our employees on the rigs to identify and stop unsafe conditions or behaviours and get those activities corrected before they proceed with the job,” explained Davis.

Each rig hand carries “Look-Out” observation cards. Once they have stopped an activity, they complete an observation card to ensure steps are taken to prevent the risk in the future. Continue reading